Posts filed under: Featured

Holiday Disclosure Post #5 – Reply and Round-Up (Bob Overing)

Bob summarizes some of the arguments from this season’s disclosure/disclosure theory battles.

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Debate for All: Intro to PICs (Tess Welch)

What is a PIC? How is a PIC different than a regular Counterplan?

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Debate for All: How to Practice Theory

How does one improve at theory? Read this advice and comment below on your own techniques!

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10 Things I Like and Don’t Like, featuring Harvard (Bob Overing)

The first edition of “10 Things I Like and Don’t Like” by Bob Overing features the Harvard tournament, plant pedagogy, and “1AR theory bad.”

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5 Fixes to Improve Your K Game

Luis Sandoval offers 5 tips to help improve your K game.

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Defining and Debating A Prioris (Noah Simon)

“What is an a priori anyway?” Noah Simon asks and answers the basic definitional question while presenting a nuanced distinction between two types of a prioris. His distinction provides insight into how debaters and theorists should approach a prioris moving forward.

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10 Things I Like and Don’t Like (Bob Overing)

The first edition of “10 Things I Like and Don’t Like” by Bob Overing features the Harvard-Westlake tournament, K vs Theory debates, “We,” and more…

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Holiday Disclosure Post #4 – A Challenge (Bob Overing)

Bob issues a public challenge to inadequate disclosers to debate him on the merits of disclosure.

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Holiday Disclosure Post #3 – Disclosure Norms in LD (Bob Overing)

Bob stakes out a spectrum of possible disclosure practices and defines three thematic divides to characterize the debates on disclosure. He defends a middle-ground approach to disclosure and clarifies exactly which practices that entails.

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Holiday Disclosure Post #2 – Reply to Kymn (Bob Overing)

Bob’s second post in response to Chris Kymn on disclosure theory applies the framework from Section 1 to out-of-round theory, forwards five reasons why theory is a superior option for this kind of unfairness, and analogizes out-of-round behavior causing in-round unfairness to the use of PEDs in sporting events.

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